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Myanmar to vaccinate Rohingya minority

Myanmar to vaccinate Rohingya minorityMyanmar to vaccinate Rohingya minority Myanmar’s Muslim Rohingya minority will be vaccinated against the coronavirus, a government military spokesman said Friday, adding that no one would be left behind in his vaccination campaign.

Millions of Rohingya fled to Bangladesh during the 2017 military operation, and those who remain complain of discrimination and abuse in a country that does not recognize them as citizens.

Myanmar to vaccinate Rohingya minority Spokesman Zhao Min Tun said authorities are making progress in reducing coronavirus infections and increasing vaccinations, and aim to vaccinate half the country’s population by the end of this year.

Myanmar to vaccinate Rohingya minority, 22 new cases of coronavirus infection and 113 additional deaths were reported on Thursday, although the number of daily cases and deaths has dropped since the peak was recorded in July.

He said the Rohingyas in Maungdaw and Buthidong districts would be vaccinated at the Bangladesh border.

He called them “Bengalis”, which has been used to describe the Rohingya for decades in Buddhist-majority Myanmar.

“They are our people too,” Jao Min Tun told a regular news conference. “We will not leave anyone behind.”

It was not immediately clear whether the vaccination campaign would be expanded and what the eligibility criteria would be for Rohingya Muslims living in densely populated camps in Rakhine State.

Myanmar to vaccinate Rohingya minority The issue is very sensitive in Myanmar, where hostility towards the Rohingya is deep. International rights groups say millions of stateless Rohingya should be entitled to citizenship rather than being discriminated against and branded as illegal immigrants.

Earlier this month, a junta-appointed administrator said there were no plans to include Rohingya in camps near the state capital, Sittwe.

At least 700,000 Rohingya fled Rakhine to Bangladesh in 2017 during an army operation led by General Min Aung Hlaing, who is now prime minister and head of the Burmese junta.

UN investigators said the raids were carried out with “genocidal intent”, but the military denied this and said their goal was to deal with Rohingya “terrorists”.

 

Myanmar’s Muslim Rohingya minority will be vaccinated against the coronavirus, a government military spokesman said Friday, adding that no one would be left behind in his vaccination campaign.

According to a Reuters report, millions of Rohingya fled to Bangladesh during the 2017 military operation and complained of discrimination and abuse in countries that do not recognize them as citizens.

Authorities are making progress in reducing coronavirus infections and increasing vaccinations, and aim to vaccinate half of the country’s population by the end of this year, spokesman Jao Mintun said.

Myanmar to vaccinate Rohingya minority In Myanmar, 22 new cases of coronavirus infection and 113 additional deaths were reported on Thursday, although the number of daily cases and deaths has dropped since the peak was recorded in July.

He said the Rohingyas from Maungdaw and Buthidong districts would be vaccinated at the Bangladesh border.

He called them “Bengalis”, which has been used to describe the Rohingya for decades in Buddhist-majority Myanmar.

“They are our people too,” Jao Min Tun told a regular news conference. “We will not leave anyone behind.”

It was not immediately clear whether the vaccination campaign would be expanded and what the eligibility criteria would be for Rohingya Muslims living in densely populated camps in Rakhine State.

The issue is very sensitive in Myanmar, where hostility towards the Rohingya is deep. International rights groups say millions of stateless Rohingya should be entitled to citizenship rather than being discriminated against and branded as illegal immigrants.

Earlier this month, a junta-appointed administrator said there were no plans to include Rohingya in camps near the state capital, Sittwe.

At least 700,000 Rohingya fled Rakhine to Bangladesh in 2017 during an army operation led by General Min Aung Hlaing, who is now prime minister and head of the Burmese junta.

UN investigators say the operation was carried out with “genocidal intent”, but the military denies it and says it was aimed at

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