August 4, 2021
Smoke could rise from wildfire says Nevada Cavid-19 study

Smoke could rise from wildfire says Nevada Cavid-19 study

Smoke could rise from wildfire says Nevada Cavid-19 study

Smoke could rise from wildfire says Nevada Cavid-19 study
Smoke could rise from wildfire says Nevada Cavid-19 study

Smoke could rise from wildfire says Nevada Cavid-19 study Nevada-based scientists have argued in a new study that smoke from wildfires may increase the risk of coronavirus contractions.

A study published last week by scientists at the Desert Research Institute found that the rate of coronavirus infection increased uncontrollably during the wildfire season of 2020, when fires in neighboring states left much of the northern Nevada empty.

Smoke could rise from wildfire says Nevada Cavid-19 study In a study published in the Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology, Daniel Kisser, associate scientist at the Desert Research Institute, and four co-authors note that when measuring high levels of particles in the air, it is important to note the increase in periods.

For every 10 micrograms per cubic meter of small particles known as PM2.5 in the air, the positive rate increased by about 6.3% after two to six days, according to the study.

Kaiser said the study was observational and noted that the optics could also be attributed to other factors such as last year’s second inducement, students returning to school, or changes in local restrictions. . However, he said that in times of heavy pollution, transient optics suggest a link between smoke and viral infection.

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“Amid a bigger upheaval in the country as a whole, this temporary resource confirms that something is happening to us,” he told The Associated Press.

The authors argued that the occurrence between fire smoke and coronaviruses likely suggests that pollution makes people more infected with the virus.

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“Our research also encourages arguments from other sources, such as vehicle trafficking or PM2.5 from industry,” they wrote, adding that coronaviruses are more susceptible to the virus.

Kiser said weather events brought on by wildfires and other climate changes could lead to larger studies in the future for studying viruses.

Smoke from the Tamarac fire and the Beckworth compound fire is spreading to parts of northern Nevada, causing pollution in Reno, Carson City and Gardnerville.

Smoke could rise from wildfire says Nevada Cavid-19 study

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