July 31, 2021

Western forces in Afghanistan as bag packs, aid agency displacement encourages new rounds

The first wave of Afghan refugees fleeing a Soviet aggression is four decades old, and nearly 20 years after the country transformed into a US-led aggression, humanitarian agencies say the Taliban are preparing for another round of displacement in Afghanistan as the region prepares to withdraw in September.
This week, the top U.S. military commander in Afghanistan warned that chaos and civil war could be on the horizon. Intelligence analysts in the United States fear the Afghan government could fall sharply in the run-up to the US withdrawal. President Biden has sought to reassure Afghan leaders in Washington that “there is a humanitarian commitment to the Afghan people,” the aid agency said.
Hosting millions of Afghans long ago in nearby countries they would not be equipped with a new inflow handle if the security situation in Afghanistan continued to deteriorate and aid refugees remained underfunded international programs.
Afghans fleeing war and violence have long sought security in Pakistan, Turkey, Iran, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. Many Afghans in these countries remain mired in poverty, undocumented and subject to limitations to work under constant pressure to leave.
“It is the responsibility of all international actors to continue working with Afghanistan to secure a lasting peace and to continue hosting Afghan refugees,” said Indrika Ratwatte, director of the Asia-Pacific Bureau for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). Last month.
The economic crisis related to covid-19 has “already billed” the burden for the host country, Ratwatte said.

Insecure and turbulent conditions for Afghans in Pakistan, Iran, Turkey and other nearby countries could push many more people to Europe to try to move dangerously.

“Afghanistan’s stability goes beyond the region,” Ratwatte said. “It’s everyone’s common interest.”